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These images were taken on 9 September 2017 at Electric Works in Sheffield during the Heritage Open Days Weekend.  Members of the public were allowed access to the ground floor and also to the permanently installed Helter Skelter!

Below is the outside of the building taken 17 April 2017

Electric Works | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe | SP1020293E PC

Click HERE to visit the Electric Works website

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Electric Works | Volume 1

5. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030454E B&W

 

3. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030404E B&W

 

1. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030394E B&W

 

7. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030462E B&W

 

2. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030401E B&W

 

4. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030446E B&W

 

6. Pick Yourself Up And Pull Yourself Together | 2017 | Alex Chinneck | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030461E B&W

PICK YOURSELF UP AND PULL YOURSELF TOGETHER

This work by sculptor Alex Chinneck was installed for one week at Tinsley in Sheffield.  It  was a taster for his proposals of more permanent works alongside the Sheffield Canal.  Local residents and school children were invited to see the sculpture and to meet the artist.

More images in colour HERE on Little Bits of Sheffield

More wonderful work from Alex on his website HERE

Alex Chinneck | Sheffield | 2017

Vertical Hold #11 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe |

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 11

Vertical Hold #10 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe |

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 10

Vertical Hold #8 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe |

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 9

Vertical Hold #9 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030294E

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 8

Vertical Hold #7 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe |

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 7

Vertical Hold #6 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe | SP1020503

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 6

Vertical Hold #3 | Sheffield 2017 | © Postcard Cafe | SP1030304E

VERTICAL HOLD

The title for this series of photographs is borrowed from the time when televisions used cathode ray tubes to produce the on screen image.

The lack of precision timing components in early television receivers meant that the timebase circuits occasionally needed manual adjustment. If their free-run frequencies were too far from the actual line and field rates, the circuits would not be able to follow the incoming sync signals. Loss of horizontal synchronization usually resulted in an unwatchable picture; loss of vertical synchronization would produce an image rolling up or down the screen.

The adjustment took the form of horizontal hold and vertical hold controls, usually on the front panel along with other common controls. These adjusted the free-run frequencies of the corresponding timebase oscillators.

By the early 1980s the efficacy of the synchronization circuits, plus the inherent stability of the sets’ oscillators, had been improved to the point where these controls were no longer necessary.

More about analogue cathode ray television HERE

Vertical Hold | 5